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20131202
20131210
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security agency? >> i would like to apply the fourth amendment to third party records. so when i have a contract with a phone company, i think those are still my records and you can look at them if you're from the government if you ask a judge. a warrant applies to one person. not to everyone in america. it's absolutely against the spirit and the letter of the fourth amendment to say that a judge can write one warrant and you can get every phone call in america and that's what's happening. i think it's wrong. it goes against everything america stands for and i will help to fight that all the way to the support. we need to get the supreme court to re-examine our records. >> so, you would ban if you could, all mass data mining. >> i'm for going after terrorists with every tool we have. i'm not opposed to the nsa, to spying, but i am infavor of the fourth amendment. if you think someone's a terrorist, you call a judge, get a warrant. if that's person's called 100 people, you get 100 more warrants. if they've called 10,000 people, you've got to get 10,000 warrants and it's a pain, but it'
sense. from td ameritrade. >>> is the national security agency infiltrating video games? documents released by former nsa contractor edward snowden she in 2008, the agency planted sleeper agents inside games like world of war craft and second life, amid concerns that those games could be used by terror groups to coordinate attacks. the documents were published today. i talked to spencer ackerman, u.s. national security editor at the guardian which was one of those who broke the story, and i asked him how a game like world of war craft could possibly be a hotbed for terrorist activity. >> world of war craft, like many other really popular addictive, immersive individual yvideo gam deeply, deeply richly developed fantasy game in which you go on quests along with your virtual friends and face things like weird creatures and other things that i don't know about because of course i would never play these types of games. no, never. >> would a terrorist group use such a game to launch an attack? >> well, that's kind of unclear, but the suspicion around the late 2,000s was that as more of
're trying to eliminate. >> when you saw the story about the national security agency, basically patrolling all of the cell phones in the world, basically, a lot of young people point to the privacy requirements. they don't like to be part of anything collecting information. health care, is this going to be one of the detriments to people signing up, they want to keep their privacy? >> health care is entirely different. it's similar to seniors who sign up for medicare or people who file their taxes. you know, there are a whole bunch of things where you're providing information to the government, it's protected, it's governed by a whole series of law. nsa is a broader issue and, you're right, young people are rightly sensitive to the needs to preserve their privacy and to maintain internet freedom and, by the way, so am i. that's part of not just our first amendment rights and expectations in this country but it's particularly something that young people care about because they spend so much time texting and, you know, instagraming and, you know -- >> whatever. >> something is coming up ever
security agency, basically patrolling all of the cell phones in the world, basically, a lot of young people point to the privacy requirements. they don't like being part of anything that's collecting information. health care. is this going to be one of the detriments to people wanting to sign up? they want to keep their privacy? >> first of all, health care is entirely different. it's more similar to seniors who sign up for medicare or people who file their taxes. you know, there are a whole bunch of things where you're providing information to the government. it's protected. it's governed by a whole series of laws. the nsa issue is a broader issue. you're right. young people rightly are sensitive to the needs to preserve their privacy and maintain internet freedom. and, by the way, so am i. that's part of not just our first amendment rights, and expectations in this country, but it's particularly something that young people care about, because they spend so much time texting and, you know, instagraming and -- vining. there's -- something is coming up every single day. so all of us spend mo
the lesser of two evils. good evening, katherine. >> reporter: the national security council staff and the intelligence agencies are referring all questions about the u.s. government's contacts with syria to the state department where today a spokesperson tries to play down direct talks as old news. >> we've been engaging with the broad section for a long time. it's been ongoing. of course we're incredibly concerned about the terrorist threat in syria. we've made that very clear. that's why we talk to the opposition all the time. >> reporter: as first reported by the "wall street journal" the u.s. and gulf nations are engaging with islamist groups in order to strengthen those who are not directly linked to the al qaeda franchises in syria. while these groups including the newly organized islamic front are not members of al qaeda, they still fly the black flag and support the establishment of an islamic state within syria, which runs counter to democratic principles. as for the syrian president assad, who's agreed to send a delegation to january peace talks in geneva, switzerland, d
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5